Hyphen magazine - Asian American arts, culture, and politics


Recent comments

  • The ABCs of Hmong   1 year 13 weeks ago

    This is the same article that was posted in the blog section in December. Same story, just worded differently.

    This article: A typical day for the teachers in the program begins before 7am. Most remain long after school has ended and are often there on weekends. Their commitment is the product of both practical necessity — they need to prepare curricula — and personal experience.

    December article: A typical day for Sao Vue, Her and Chia Thao, the teachers in the program, begins before 7 a.m. Most remain long after school has ended, and are often there on the weekends. Their commitment is the product of both practical necessity and personal experience.

    What is the purpose for republishing the same article but with different sentences? Especially as the ONE article in the whole issue that doesn't fit the theme. is this a follow up to Momo's December article? How often do Hyphen republish blog posts from six months ago as magazine articles?

  • Iraqi Refugees Sue President Bush over Losses in Iraq War   1 year 13 weeks ago

    Mr Comar appears to be using these "victims" to his own benefit and at tax payer expense. Suing the government will be good for his future legal business.

  • Iraqi Refugees Sue President Bush over Losses in Iraq War   1 year 13 weeks ago

    Stupid people. Still looking to get rich on the USA money. Not enough they get their freebees. Where is the Mafia when you need 'em. I would like to sue them for trashing our USA and killing our legal citizens.

  • These Three Things   1 year 14 weeks ago

    "I had a steadfast rule until I was in my 20s of not dating anyone who previously dated an Asian."

    So you couldn't date just an Asian person ?

  • Through the Long Winter: A Look Back at Radiolab's Yellow Rain Controversy   1 year 14 weeks ago

    Kalia, thank you for writing this. I usually love Radiolab, but I recently listened to the episode you and your Uncle were interviewed for and I was appalled by how Robert treated you. His interview and complete lack of sensitivity were completely inappropriate and colored my views of him and Radiolab in a definite negative light. I really hope you find outlets for your stories and your Uncles stories without the trespassing of those with more power.

  • Yellow Power   1 year 14 weeks ago

    Make a double-ended dildo (like a Realdoe) that's actually colored for Asian skin tones and I will be intrigued. It'd probably do a lot of good for many trans* Asians, too...

  • AAPI Groups Question Implementation of Health Care Reform   1 year 14 weeks ago

    Thank you for this important article. My MIL is an immigrant from Japan. Though she has lived in this country for over 40 years, her English is still very poor. Recently she went to a small clinic in Enumclaw WA for a chronic, painful knee condition. The nurse had an incredibly difficult time understanding her. But instead of working compassionately and creatively, the nurse became frustrated, impatient, infuriated; yelling and snapping at my MIL. The incident was so awful that my MIL (a) didn't go back to get the care she needed and (b) DIDN'T TELL US until much later. Because of shame, embarrassment, avoidance, denial? We were horrified when she finally did tell us and wanted to demand justice. At that point however, my MIL was done with the whole thing. Her knee still isn't great but she insists self-care and self-treatment are making it better.

    I am sad and angry about this incident. And worried about my MIL. As a nation we should be doing better for our own.

    Multiracial Asian Families
    http://multiasianfamilies.blogspot.com/

  • Long Live Raja   1 year 14 weeks ago

    Suntan/Raja I can't wait to see you in Seattle at the New Legally Wed Game show! I enjoyed watching you on drag race & was so happy when you won. My friend & I will be in your audience tomorrow & we are really looking forward to it. We are fierce Glamberts but don't let that scare you LOL! You are very creative and I think both Raja & Sutan are very attractive. See you in Seattle!

  • In the Face of Bullying   1 year 14 weeks ago

    I absolutely love your blog and find many of your post’s to be just what I’m looking for. can you offer guest writers to write content for you? I wouldn’t mind producing a post or elaborating on many of the subjects you write in relation to here. Again, awesome web site!

  • Giving It Up: Immigrant Parents and Sacrifice   1 year 16 weeks ago

    I'd rather play with my boy than go clubbing. He doesn't dress or dance like a douche or threaten to fight me over a girl or spill drinks on me. (Well, he does get annoyed when I hug Mom and he'll spill water from a sippy cup on me, but that's it.) Not much sacrifice there.

  • Giving It Up: Immigrant Parents and Sacrifice   1 year 16 weeks ago

    Read Proud Americans: Growing Up As Children of Immigrants. Thanks for your blog. Good reading.

  • Hyphen TV: Better French Food than the Frenchies   1 year 19 weeks ago

    I agree with the comments below. I thought Cole did get robbed because they felt bad for Chehon.

  • Crazy, Stupid, Korean Love: On David Choe, Han, and 'Unmarriageable' Koreans   1 year 19 weeks ago

    I am a Korean American male. One thing that many other Korean Americans do not appreciate or fully understand about "han" are the unique historical reasonings for it. Korea, as a smaller country surrounded by larger nations, has had to survive invasions from each in various times in its history. Sometimes the only way to survive massive invasions from huge armies were to offer an insane amount of resistance behind walled fortresses or in irregular guerrilla groups that Koreans called "Righteous Armies."

    China too also suffered massive invasions from a variety of Northern Barbarian groups throughout its history from the likes of the Mongols, Jurchens and Manchus. Yet, Korea is not China. China, with its much larger population and land mass, could easily absorb these groups without losing their national character. China could afford to be invaded, conquered and then, over time, civilize the invaders and turn them into Chinese simply by the fact that they heavily outnumbered their would be conquerors. This is why today Manchuria and Outer Mongolia is Chinese territory. Anyways, I digress. The point is that the Chinese developed a more accommodating "beta" culture of turning whatever is around them into "Chinese" by having a less aggressive national character.

    Koreans, on the other had, developed a more aggressive national character because it had to. This manifests itself most directly into "han." The negative characteristics of "han" are in taking things (including themselves) way too seriously, holding grudges, impulsiveness, not looking before one leaps, short tempers, overreading situations, obsessive/compulsiveness, wild swings between love and hate, lack of communications with people we don't know very well, etc. However, one must remember that "han" is a double edged sword (or coin, if you will). It has some powerful positive influences too such as goal orientation to the extreme, creativity in music, dramas and movies, powerful "groupthink," extreme optimism, independent streak, national pride/patriotism, strong family and community bonds, etc.

    Koreans are who they are, but their negatives should be balanced out by their positives in how media and other Asians think and portray them. True, Koreans have created a vicious and warped government like North Korea, but other Koreans have created electronics, car and ship building companies better than what the Japanese currently have and what the Chinese do not yet have despite having but a fraction of the populations of what what these aforementioned nations posses.

  • Crazy, Stupid, Korean Love: On David Choe, Han, and 'Unmarriageable' Koreans   1 year 20 weeks ago

    thank you for this. My son who is bi-racial and who proclaims himself as a "black Korean" was explaining to his friends why he identifies himself as such. His answer to his friends was- "its this Han thing I just can't turn it off". At thirteen he did a better job explaining it than i did at his age. Great post.

  • Crazy, Stupid, Korean Love: On David Choe, Han, and 'Unmarriageable' Koreans   1 year 20 weeks ago

    I am a Korean American male. One thing that many other Korean Americans do not appreciate or fully understand about "han" are the unique historical reasonings for it. Korea, as a smaller country surrounded by larger nations, has had to survive invasions from each in various times in its history. Sometimes the only way to survive massive invasions from huge armies were to offer an insane amount of resistance behind walled fortresses or in irregular guerrilla groups that Koreans called "Righteous Armies."

    China too also suffered massive invasions from a variety of Northern Barbarian groups throughout its history from the likes of the Mongols, Jurchens and Manchus. Yet, Korea is not China. China, with its much larger population and land mass, could easily absorb these groups without losing their national character. China could afford to be invaded, conquered and then, over time, civilize the invaders and turn them into Chinese simply by the fact that they heavily outnumbered their would be conquerors. This is why today Manchuria and Outer Mongolia is Chinese territory. Anyways, I digress. The point is that the Chinese developed a more accommodating "beta" culture of turning whatever is around them into "Chinese" by having a less aggressive national character.

    Koreans, on the other had, developed a more aggressive national character because it had to in order to survive as a unique people and nation. This manifests itself most directly into "han." The negative characteristics of "han" are in taking things (including themselves) way too seriously, holding grudges, impulsiveness, not looking before one leaps, short tempers, overreading situations, obsessive/compulsiveness, wild swings between love and hate, lack of communications with people we don't know very well, etc. However, one must remember that "han" is a double edged sword (or coin, if you will). It has some powerful positive influences too such as goal orientation to the extreme, creativity in music, dramas and movies, powerful "groupthink," extreme optimism, independent streak, national pride/patriotism, strong family and community bonds, etc.

    Koreans are who they are, but their negatives should be balanced out by their positives in how media and other Asians think and portray them. True, Koreans have created a vicious and warped government like North Korea, but other Koreans have created electronics, car and ship building companies better than what the Japanese currently have and what the Chinese do not yet have despite having but a fraction of the populations of what what these aforementioned nations posses.

  • Fixin’ to Go Mainstream   1 year 20 weeks ago

    I understand the intent of showcasing individuals who "are trailblazing a path and encouraging more APIs to become involved in their communities." Visibility and representation are vitally important for Asian Americans--this is why a magazine like Hyphen is necessary. If the purpose of this piece is simply to show "Asian Americans [who] are on the rise in Southern politics", then this piece succeeds. However, if suggesting that these individuals are positive role models who are guiding the way, then we should be wary of someone like Bobby Jindal whose footsteps have been harmful to the community--especially for women, immigrants, the lgbt community, and students. In writing about "crossing beyond the…API line", Navidad and Yang seem to suggest the importance of going beyond an insular experience. As a Cambodian American woman, I'm not interested in seeing Asian American representation in isolation; the intersectionalities of oppression and disenfranchisement must be included in our discussion of what it means to be Asian American.

  • Deliberate Distortions: 'Radiolab' and the Hmong Story   1 year 20 weeks ago

    Baloney. It was pretty clear that Eng and Kalia Yang just wanted a soapbox to talk about atrocities done to the Hmong, then claimed racism when it didn't go their way. Idiots like you who see racism everywhere is the actual reason we still have racism, so grow up.

  • The Science of Racism: Radiolab's Treatment of Hmong Experience   1 year 21 weeks ago

    RadioLab did everything they could to present their information, as well as the history of the Hmong people, in the context of this segment. Accusations of racism are totally out of line, suspect, and should be looked at with suspicion!

    I will continue to listen to, as well as support RadioLab.

  • Online Exclusive: Urine Lane by Saskya Jain   1 year 22 weeks ago

    Thanks for the article to give us a wonderful material.

  • Face Blindness: The Misidentification of Sunil Tripathi as the Boston Marathon Bomber   1 year 22 weeks ago

    Both this author and Alex Pareene didn't mention that there was interest by people in the similar timing of Tripathi's disappearance and an incident of bombings that occurred in Hanover, Massachusetts.

    http://wcfcourier.com/news/local/video-officers-detonate-pipe-bomb-found...

  • Do Asian Americans Yelp Like Crazy?   1 year 23 weeks ago

    I love bacon but hate crispy bacon!!! I don't think I am alone on that, at least I know of others in the Greater Seattle area that share my affinity for less than crispy bacon!! It definitely does not have to be crispy to be "good"!

  • Asian American Mothers and Postpartum Food Traditions: Korean Seaweed Soup Recipe   1 year 23 weeks ago

    Hello ~ thanks for sharing this great recipe to give us a peek about Korean's postpartum soup, I heard this is exactly what they (American Korean, or Korean) eat during postpartum period.

    But postpartum meals in Chinese way is to have a lot more varieties to provide its functional purpose step by step throughout 4 week long postpartum period. For C - section, it may even take up to 5 week long.

    We use LOTS LOTS of aged ginger, rice wine, and sesame oil to make "pork liver soup", "pork kidney soup", and "sesame oil chicken soup", but these are just common examples out from many different recipes. We also use "tea oil" to substitute sesame oil if woman's body condition is considered "dry and warm".

    Based on Chinese doctor's prescription, we also add Chinese herbs into herb soups and herb teas. Postpartum meals (diet) care is a pop culture even it has a long history in Chinese culture.

  • Fisher v. University of Texas: My Experience with Holistic Admissions   1 year 23 weeks ago

    When Sandra Day O'Connor wrote the opinion for the landmark case Grutter V. Bollinger, she emphasized the necessity of narrowly tailored admissions to promote diversity in the classroom. Diversity would foster a better society and help uplift minorities. When one day minorities groups are finally on a leveled playing field, then the admission process should be changed.

    For the most part, admissions to UT stems mainly from the top ten/eight percent rule. The few and far in between that do not make it, are then looked at a holistic basis. If the Supreme Court rules UT's admission process unconstitutional, the genetic make up of the university would change. The numbers of Caucasian and Asian would rise, while the percentage of other minority groups would decrease.

    As an Asian American, I'm quite torn on how I feel about this court case. Is society ready for the admission process to change and what other implications could this have? Are minorities at an equal playing field?

    No, definitely not in Texas. I want more Asian Americans to get accepted to UT but there's other issues I find far more pertinent.

    It seems if UT's admission process is ruled unconstitutional, the top ten percent rule would be removed as well. That has far-reaching implications. The top ten admissions, was created to counter Texas' horrible public education system. In Texas, public education is funding by property taxes. The inner-city schools then get less funding than those in wealthier communities. Can you imagine going to one school that has an excessive amount of money (with all sorts of funding for extracurricular activities?) While, the school down the street can barely afford lab equipment? There's a disadvantage. The top ten/eight percent rules provides those that succeed academically in their community access to any Texas public university. This process helps counter an extremely unequal and unfair education system.

    If the admission process is changed, those that come from crappy schools will have a tougher time getting into college. They'll have to compete with the surburbanite kids that go to SAT prep classes and whose school gives them all kinds of support with leadership positions and extracurricular activities.

    Yes, merit is important. The chips are, however, stacked to favor a particular side in Texas-- and that's the wealthy.

    The admission process helps alleviate inequality within race and wealth. That being said, I don't think Texas is ready to get rid of holistic admissions.

    As a UT student, I have my own opinions about my school. I love it the way it is. I value diversity. I enjoy learning about other people's upbringing, struggles and cultures. I wouldn't want to go to a university where there's a homogenous population, where everyone came from the same background. Differences foster growth and progression. I hope the SCOTUS keeps it that way.

  • Books: Zen Buddhist Priesthood Becomes Her   1 year 23 weeks ago

    Few reviews make me want to getup and do something, if I'm lucky the might give me a rough idea if the book sucks or not. Yours actually made me go look this up on audible. Nice writing, you should share your reviews on some of the book sites (amazon, shelfari, audible).

  • Hyphen's Bittersweet Issue: Out Now   1 year 24 weeks ago

    Her parents were unique while his father loved playing piano her mother was good at singing and she loved
    singing. Fritz Popp, found that living things transmit small packets of light called photons.
    Here are some of the most basic online creative
    writing courses I came across:.

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